Plants Peonies

last update August 2014


If you have arrivedhere from a Search Engine like Google,
click here to display the SITE INDEX.
Other Navigation Links at bottom of page.

Prices include all taxes and handling fees. Shipping bareroot in fall; see order form for cost. Canada only! at this point.


 

In spring of 2010 I officially registered a new cultivar of Peony, "Contador's Triple Crown". Description and pictures here. No, sorry, not for sale at present.

Page Index

General Information

 

 

 

 

Most are quite shade tolerant and are good woodland plants, in addition to doing well in sunny areas too. They flower earlier than the garden peonies, have shorter stems and single-flower shape. The only detractors are that a few are not as easy of cultivation, few double forms exist (and none of those are growing here), and most have no fragrance at all while those that do, lack the heady perfume of the garden peonies of lactiflora origins. In addition to the information on this page, I have been posting a running commentary on these plants at my Web Log (or Blog) http://peonies-of-leo.blogspot.com/ (please use Copy and Paste into browser address box - for some reason I can't create a proper link to this page!); a look at the 2006 and 2007 entries will give an idea of their time and order of flowering as well as additional photos and comment.

All my peonies are now grown in pots of decent sizes; this allows on-site customers to take them away at any time of the year, although mail order peonies will only be shipped in fall. Potted peonies taken home in spring or summer should be planted IN THEIR POTS when you get them home, and not depotted until September or October. This will optimize their establishment in their new home (due to the root's growth cycle).

I currently have for sale:

 

 


Peonies have their own page because the species types are a passion with me (and have been for some years). So this is now starting to become a very significant portion of the website, perhaps not in volume but definitely in terms of speciality.

Peonies started from seed were originally grown on in nursery beds at a couple of places but are now being grown in appropriate-sized pots, until they flower, at which time they will be for sale without dividing, for the most part. I have discovered that they are happier than clams in the pots up to a more mature size than I expected. A few Peony cultivars propagated from divisions in autumn are being grown on in large pots; they can be bought at the nursery in the pots throughout the spring and summer or mail ordered at any time for shipping bare root in September.

Plants for customers ordering by mail will be segregated from the main pot farms when they are ordered or when they flower, and reserved for those customers. So even though their plants will not be shipped until fall they are not getting the "leftovers" but will get the best plant available when their order comes in.

Local customers can make sure of getting their selection by ordering by mail for pickup later in the season.

Tree Peony seedlings are being grown in large pots (> 2 gallons) rather than in the ground (we don't have a good place to grow them on), and are (perhaps) unlikely to flower in that size although some have made a liar out of me by flowering anyways. Those listed have been through several winters in their unsheltered pots and can either be bought at the nursery potted or mail-ordered for bare-root shipping in early fall. (Tree peonies ordered for shipping will have their stems and branches pruned in order to fit in a box that will not cost an arm and a leg to mail.)


Some links of interest:

For Information on Species Peonies: this page is a segment of the Canadian Peony Society website; it features a few articles which I wrote for the CPS, and some photos. Ignore the bit about forming a species peony group "this year", and although I initially headed it I don't any more.

Canadian Peony Society homepage. Here you will find listings of, and links to, other Canadian sources for peonies, as well as general information on growing them.

 


Paeonia

2005 was the beginning of an era here, marking the first year of flowering, and hence of availability for sale, of some of the species which I've started growing more recently than anomala and veitchii. Additional selections came into flower and became available in following years, although a few of those may be temporarily unavailable in a flowering size due to fluctuations in population due to sales and coming on of new crops (but they are expected to be available again soon).

Canadian Gardener magazine carried an article in 2006 entitled "Six Weeks of Peonies", which pretty much ignored most of the species, as they were pretty much outside of the authors' and consultants' ken. In fact here the first of the peonies to flower according to that article is three weeks after the first to flower for me and there are several species which precede their 6 weeks. So if I had some of their later candidates, I could have 8 or 9 weeks of Peonies; as it is, I have 7 weeks here. The first to bloom here, P tomentosa, starts in late May; the latest are the Garden peonies, of which some are still in flower in mid-July.

Most plants listed are available either (1) on site from spring onwards, since all are nicely potted and moveable or (2) by ordering by mail prepaid for August/September delivery. September is the best time of year to transplant bare-root peonies (August is good too for some of the species), with second choice being later in the fall. Potted plants are best held in their pots until September, at which time they can be safely depotted and planted out without risk of set-back (which may occur if the rootball falls apart during depotting earlier in the year).

My species peonies are all grown from seed and come to you as the entire root, I aren't [sic!] doing divisions of them. Seed origins can be from the wild, from plants in gardens (my own or elsewhere in the world), or in the case of seed acquired commercially of unknown provenance. Seed from plants growing in gardens may have been pollinated from other species of peonies, or different forms of the same species. The hybrids may be fairly obvious to the untrained eye, or may appear identical to the seed parent. Seed origin for each is given in the writeups.

Some seed batches have widely diverse foliage or flower characteristics, and some are quite uniform. So far, one of the most uniform batches is of wild origin, and the most diverse batches are anomala and veitchii from seed of my own plants; these two species flower concurrently here most years and may very well be hybridizing. The fun continues.


Paeonia anomala 0570 $25.00

photos: ...flower ...plant ... seed ...carpel ...flower variant ... another ...

Available potted on site, or bareroot by mail order in fall. Common names: Anomalous Peony (but don't ask me why). Seed origin: my garden plants. A mid-height perennial, hardy to zone 3 or colder. LOW MAINTENANCE. Of Upright habit, colonizing mainly by slowly creeping rootstocks. Slow-growing and of very long lifespan. Height: to 2', and 3' wide. Native to Russian NW Kola peninsula/ C Asia/ the Altai/ Mongolia/ N China/ W Gobi. Should be the hardiest species! Variable in form and flower colour depending on where in its very wide range the plant or seed originated. My original plants resemble the form Halda finds "north of Baikal", but only somewhat. This is the plant written up on the Canadian Peony Society website Species pages. Plants of the current seed batch are more variable in fineness of leaf division and flower colour than I've seen before. Recommended site: sun or light shade. Soil: fertile to good, sandy loam, reliably moist but well-drained. Deep soil. Naturally occurs in coniferous woods, dry grasslands, rocky hillsides, amongst shrubs. For me, does well in some shade in a "normal" clay-based garden soil on a slight slope. Crown of the root likes to be exposed, and dormant buds form on the exposed part: probably trying to find a cold enough winter temperature. Foliage deep green; of fine texture. Fine leaves deeply divided in segments of varying width from one plant to another. Large flowers are borne as individuals for about a week in late spring. Flower single, rather flat, usually a rose pink with a silky sheen and texture which many find very attractive, but sometimes darker or lighter. Earlier blooming than garden peonies by a few weeks, but not the earliest of the species. May develop sidebuds if very happy in cultivation, but I haven't seen any on mine yet. Seed pods are not the showiest among peonies but not too bad either; green, turning brown when ripe, opening to display large shiny black oval seeds. Some uses: Accent, Borders and Beds, Focus, in Shrubbery, Specimens, Foliage, Cut Flowers, Decorative Seed Pods, Naturalizing Meadows, Naturalizing Woodlands. Link to a more detailed article I've written.

Paeonia anomala var. intermedia 0570A $35.00

photos: ...flower ...plant ... seed ...carpel ...

Pretty much the same as the above, but these are grown from seed with provenance and do not have the variability of the garden seed plants.


Paeonia caucasica (Paeonia mascula) 1669 $35.00

photos: ...flower ...plant...leaf (darker form)... plant again ...carpel... seed...

Available potted on site, or bareroot by mail order in fall. ...also goes by the name(s) Paeonia daurica; Paeonia mascula subsp. mascula... Grown from seed collected in SE Republic of Georgia (NOT the Georgia in the USA!). Common name(s): Caucasus Peony. A mid-height perennial, hardy to Zone 5, and probably colder. Clump-forming and of long lifespan. Height: to 1.5-2ft. Native and endemic to the Caucasus mountains (where Europe meets W. Asia). Stems branching, 1.5-3ft tall. Flowers rose-violet or deep-rose. Closely related to Paeonia mascula, or a subspecies thereof according to some botanists; from what I can see in my plants, any visual differences are rather minor (but flowers a bit smaller), but caucasica seems to be easier and faster to grow from seed. Naturally occuring in forests, shrub thickets and grassy meadows at altitudes of 900-2000m. Light required: part shade to sun (vigorous in my woodland test bed). Soil: not fussy-- does well in normal garden soil for us. Said to be lime-tolerant. Environmental Wetness: moist to dryish. Plants in sandy soils tend to have more leaves and flower sparsely, whilst those growing on clay take longer to become established but produce better blooms. Strongly resents root disturbance, taking some time to recover after being divided. Good foliage, dark green above, grey-green beneath. Attractive rounded leaflets. Large sumptuous flowers rosy-red to red-pink; borne singly at the tips of the stems for about a week several weeks before the garden peonies and one of the earlier species to flower. Fat fuzzy seed pods opening green and quite showy when open. For Borders, Woodlands, Foliage. Flowers used in a red dye. Also has herbal uses.


Paeonia mlokosewitschii 1348 $50.00

photos: ...flower ...plant...carpel... seed ...

SOLD OUT for 2015. expect to have a few again in 2016.

See also a few fine variants - end of this segment.

... Common name(s): Golden Peony; Caucasian Peony. A Mid-height perennial, hardy to Zone 3. Low Maintenance in a proper site. Of Upright habit, forming colonies primarily by forming a slowly expanding (or creeping) Clump from rhizomes. Slow-growing and of very long lifespan. Height: to 1.5-2ft (approaching 3ft in cultivation). Native to SE Caucasus originally thought to be specifically to the region of the valley of Lagodekhi but their range is turning out to be somewhat wider, into Iran and Armenia etc. Stunning for a very brief period each year and with pretty good foliage for the rest of the growing season. A garden classic. Light required: Sun to Partial Shade. Soil: good, prefers a good loam. Environmental Wetness: Requires reliable moisture, and good DRAINAGE esecially in winter. Optimal Fertility: highly fertile (top-dressed yearly). Has a few pests to watch for. Seldom bothered by diseases. Naturally occurring on sunny slopes in hornbeam/oak forest. Generally easy to grow, but seems less adaptable than lactiflora or officinalis. Does reasonably well for me in mainly bright shade except for a few hours full sun around midday, in a raised bed with light soil mix meant for Azaleas (loam to sandy loam, with lots of organic matter); in the prairies reliable irrigation is critical, since this species seems to require more moisture than most others. Mloko was desperately unhappy in the dry open field, and grows reasonably well in my woodland test bed where the flowers stand out wonderfully in the shade, although it is not as vigorous as in a sunnier locations. Foliage of average density; mid-green to blue-ish green depending on the plant; leaves quite large, of coarse textural effect. Lobing is larger and more rounded than what we are used to seeing on Paeonia. Purple highlights and a waxy surface texture. Very excellent at all times throught the growing season. Very large light yellow flowers are borne one per stalk for a week or two in late spring. Single form. The colour is variably described as lemon to butter. Golden stamens, purple sepals. Seed pods sometimes colour to red as they ripen, and all are particularly striking when they open. In it's native area it blooms in April; here it blooms in early June usually. May be susceptible to bud damage by late frosts in some areas? Some uses are: for Accent...in the perennial Border...for visual Focus...in amongst Shrubbery...as a Specimen plant...for the effect of its Foliage...makes a good Cut Flower for arrangements... in wildflower Meadows... Link to a more detailed article I've written.

Paeonia mlokosewitschii hybrids 1348P $50.00

photos: ...flower ...

please choose by the specific SMT number.

These "apricot" to "peach" hybrids have a much better fragrance than the species itself, markedly spicey along the lines of cloves or allspice! The red/pink highlights are most marked upon the opening of the flower, and fade during the week or so of the bloom.

SMT1003

photo is near end of flower's life, faded and starting to droop

 


Paeonia obovata 1564 $35.00

photos: ...flower ...plants in the woodland nursery bed...another...emerging leaf...carpel... seed ...

Available bareroot by mail order in fall. This lot is from seed collected wild from a population in forests near Vladivostok, Siberia; the flower colour is consistent for all my plants of this lot. A Low to Mid-height perennial, hardy to Zone 4 or colder. Low Maintenance in a proper site. Of Upright habit, forming colonies primarily by forming a slowly expanding Clump from rhizomes. Slow-growing and of very long lifespan. Height: to 16"-2', and 2-3' wide. Native to Asia: Siberia/ Manchuria/ China/ Japan. Wideranging and thus quite variable. May grow to 3' in cultivation? Has ternate leaves with 9 broadly ovate leaflets, solitary and terminal flowers. Thin graceful stems, I'm not sure how they would stand up to wind, but then again, not much wind at the forest floor; actually, they are the only peonies whose stems are still upright at the end of the winter, so they are rather strong although perhaps brittle. Leaves are later to emerge than most species here, thus avoiding late frosts. They're distinctive and attractive at all stages of growth. Naturally occurs in mountain woods and scrub. Light required: Open/Dappled or Partial Shade. Ours are doing equally well in the display beds by the driveway (which is bright enough for lactiflora's to thrive) and in the woodland display bed which is quite shady; this is the only species which I haven't planted in the open field so I don't know how it would be in full sun. Soil: a well-drained woodland soil (lots of compost) works well for me here. Considered difficult by some US authors, maybe because of ignoring the natural habitat issues of shade and coolness and trying to grow them like the lactifloras and hybrids... more on this: my sister has trouble with obovata in Edmonton Alta in a clayey soil, but they do well in sandy soil at the nearby Devonian Botanical Garden, so there is clearly a cultivation issue in colder climates. Leaves continue to increase in size significantly after flowering. Range of flower colour(s) includes: white, shades of pink to rose-purple, but ours are all rose/crimson as shown in the photo, and retain a globular shape throughout their bloom. Long narrow seedpods in threes or twos, with an excellent show for several weeks when they open. The red aborted seeds can be seen at some distance in the woods. Some uses are: Borders, Woodlands.

 

Paeonia officinalis 1714 & 1244 $30.00

photos: ...flower ... another ...flower ... plant ...

Common name(s): Common Peony. 1714 is from seed collected wild, in Italy; 1244 is of mixed origins. I only have a few of this species. A Low to Mid-height perennial, hardy to Zone Z4 or colder. Low Maintenance in a proper site. Of Upright habit, forming colonies primarily by forming a slowly expanding Clump from rhizomes. Slow-growing and of very long lifespan. Height: to 14-24in. Native to S Europe: S France/ Switzerland/ N Italy/ Hungary/ Albania. Light required: sun to light shade. Soil: normal garden soil is indicated. Soft foliage with numerous narrowly elliptic leaflets. Large flowers are borne singly for a week shortly before the garden peonies bloom. Range of flower colour(s) includes: possibly white, shades of pink, sometimes red, but ours are more of a crimson. Seed pods turning brown when ripe, not particularily showy compared to other species. Some uses are: Borders, Rock Gardens.

Paeonia officinalis subsp banatica 1684 $35.00

photos: ...flower ... another... plant ...

also goes by the name(s) Paeonia banatica; P. peregrina var. banatica; P. foemina var. banatica; P. officinalis var. banatica... A Low to Mid-height perennial, hardy to Zone 3. LOW MAINTENANCE. Of Upright habit, forming colonies primarily by forming a slowly expanding (or "creeping") Clump from rhizomes. Slow-growing and of very long lifespan. Height: to 14-20inches, but taller in partial shade here, up to about 30in. Native to E Europe: Hungary/ Croatia/ Romania. My plants are grown from commercial seed originating from Romania. Has some of the characteristics of P. mascula and of P. officinalis ssp. officinalis (causing some taxonimic confusion or variability). A plant with attractive foliage and interesting flowers, in shape and colouration. Suitable for any garden soil. Best in my partially shaded display bed but does flower in the woodland bed and also in the open field. Foliage attractively segmented and cut. Large flowers are borne as Solitary individuals for a week or 2 in late spring. "Ruby coloured" flowers, dark yellow stamens, quite showy. Seed pods turning brown when ripe, not particularily showy compared to other species. Some uses are: in the perennial Border...as a Specimen plant...in Rock Gardens...makes a good Cut Flower for arrangements...

Paeonia peregrina 1685 $35.00

photos: ...flower ...plant ... another... leaf...

No more available in 2015 but may be in 2016 (it's a matter of disintegrated labels and inability to differentiate a couple of species once the foliage is dried up!)

Also goes by the name(s) Paeonia decora; Paeonia lobata... Common name: Crimson-Flowered Peony. Low to Mid-height, hardy to Zone 4 or colder. Low Maintenance in a proper site. Of Upright habit, forming colonies primarily by forming a slowly expanding (or "creeping") clump from rhizomes. Slow-growing and of very long lifespan. Height: to 20-24 inches. Native to S Europe: S Italy/ Balkans/ Romania/ Bulgaria/ W Turkey. The "type" plant is the form in Greece, and in the UK was once known as the "single red peony of Constantinople". Very showy, a good garden plant and one of the latest species to bloom (here, just ahead of the Garden Peonies this year). May reach 3' tall in cultivation? Light required: Sun (to Partial Shade but that's not recommended for NS); my plants are most vigorous in the open field, less so in open shade, and decidedly unhappy in my woodland test bed (one of the few which are unhappy there). Soil: drained, prefers a good loam. Drought-tolerant, needing good drainage. Naturally occurs in rough fields and among limestone rocks, in scrub and oak forests. Leaves green with no hint of red while emerging, with rounded tips to the lobes. Brilliant red cup-shaped flowers borne one per stem. Range of flower colour(s) includes: scarlet to dark red, sometimes edging into pink (depending on location of origin?). Some uses are: as a Specimen plant...in the Herb Garden... Borders... Naturalizing meadows...

 


Paeonia tenuifolia 1265 $35.00

photos: ...flower ...plant ... carpels ...

Fairly small plants still but some have bloomed; there are a few different seed lots of 1265's which have different geographic origins and thus differ in size, fineness of foliage and possibly in the shade of red of the flower.

Common name(s): Fern Leaf Peony. A Low perennial, hardy to Zone 3 or colder. Low Maintenance in a proper site. Of Upright habit, forming large colonies primarily by creeping rhizomes. Slow-growing and of very long lifespan. Height: to about 2ft. Native to Europe in the S Ukraine. Excellent foliage, distinctive and deeply cut and with very narrow segments, hence the "fern leaf" name; nifty shape right out of a Dr. Seuss book while emerging; in some drier conditions foliage may go dormant in late summer. The flowers are striking blood-red, borne one per stem. Formerly considered one of the earliest peonies to flower, but is in mid-pack of the species I grow. Light required: full sun (to open shadeat more southern latitudes); this is one of the few species that is really unhappy in my woodland test plot, and even the plants in open shade are a bit stretched and flopp-ish compared to those in the field. Soil: loamy and well-drained, with a preference for slightly alkaline pH. Environmental Wetness: dryish to moist: this is one of the few grassland species and thus is more adapted to drier conditions. It can be set back a bit by wet maritime winters, although it will usually persevere and gradually increase. Some uses are: Rock Gardens, Borders, Foliage...

Link to a more detailed article I've written.


Paeonia veitchii 0569 $25.00

SOLD OUT. Unsure if I will have any in 2016.

photos: ...flower ...plant ...leaf (one of the finer ones)... another ...darker form ... carpel ...seed ...

... Common names: Veitch's Peony. Seed origin: my garden plants. A low perennial, hardy to zone 3 or colder. LOW MAINTENANCE. Of Upright habit, colonizing mainly by slowly creeping rootstocks. Slow-growing and of very long lifespan. Height: to 1-1˝', and 3˝' wide. Native to Kansu in NW China. Some of these resemble the smaller ssp woodwardii, others are in foliage like veitchii but with some darker flowers. Mostly 10 petals on the darker pinks, 5 on the paler ones. Recommended site: sun to part shade. Soil: good to rich, loamy, reliably moist but well-drained. Easily grown. Deep soil required, incorporating some clay and organic matter but NOT fresh manure. Plant with eyes no deeper than 1-2" or flowering will be drastically reduced. Some references recommend heavy (ie much clay) soil, others recommend a sandy soil (which may well be closer to the soils of its' natural range). Foliage of fine texture. Finely divided into pointed segments. Glaucous undersides. Large flowers are borne in a small panicle for a few weeks in late spring, 3 to 7 buds per stem although only 3 usually open; but the sidebuds increase the duration of flowering significantly. Flower colour: shades of pink to magenta red. Flowering is a few weeks earlier, and overlaps with, the "garden peonies". Single, flattish bowl-shaped. There is a white form. Some uses: Accent, Borders and Beds, Focus, in Shrubbery, Specimens, Foliage, Cut Flowers, Naturalizing Meadows. Link to a more detailed article I've written.


Paeonia hybrids & herbaceous types 0983K & 1682 $20.00

photos: ... all different

These are plants grown from seed of hybrids not involving Paeonia lactiflora, and from a batch or two of mixed herbaceous species resulting in plants which I can't readily put a name to. Some are clearly hybrids involving lactiflora but flowering earlier than the Garden types. Since most of these are in some way different from each other, photos of them in bloom are posted here in a "Hybrid Seedling Gallery".


Tree Peonies:

seedlings are being grown in large pots (> 2 gallons) rather than in the ground (I don't have a good place to grow them on), and are (perhaps) unlikely to flower in that size although each year there are a few that do anyways. Those listed have been through several winters in their unsheltered pots and can either be bought at the nursery potted or mail-ordered for bare-root shipping in early fall: shipped plants are likely to be somewhat pruned of root and stems.

 


Paeonia delavayi 1600 $28.00

photos: ...flower ...variant...plant ... leaf ...

Common names: Peony (Shrub Type). A shrub, hardy to USDA Zone 5 with winter protection. Low Maintenance in a proper site. Of Shrubby habit. Slow-growing and of very long lifespan. Height: to 5.5ft, and 3ft wide. Native to China (N to central Yunnan in the Lijiang mountains; parts of Szechuan and Tibet). Officially "May be reluctant to bloom colder than zone 7", but after a few years of saying this to anyone who cared to listen, a number of the plants in my pot farm put out a flower or two in the past couple of years and in '07 actually set a crop of seed! Seldom grown as the species, but much used in hybridizing because of the deep red flowers. Fairly bare branches on an upright shrub. Plants from garden seed (which these are) are often somewhat different from the wild/ true species but these so far seem true. Recommended site: sun to part shade. Soil: good, loamy, reliably moist but well-drained. Naturally occurs in scrub, thickets or open forest, and rocky to grassy open places on limestone at about 2300to 3700m altitude. Probably needs some winter protection around NS. Open, sparse foliage, of marvelous finely cut texture; can't empahsize enough how great this foliage is. Deciduous. Leaflets in clusters of 3, with those at the tips of stems standing clear from the rest. Deeply divided. Greyish-white beneath. Large flowers (but small relative to other peonies) are borne in a very small cluster for a few weeks in late spring. Single or up to 5 flowers per stem, hidden amongst the foliage, smaller than in the suffruticosa group of tp's. Generally blackish red to maroon, the darkest flowers of Paeonia; 9- 12 petals; a plant from a different seedlot, putatively wild-collected, flowered this year with a somewhat larger flower in a brighter shade of red, more like the handel-mazetti. Some uses: in Shrubbery, Specimens, Foliage, Foundation plantings, Naturalizing.


Paeonia x handel-mazzettii 1695 $28.00

photos: ... flower... another ... leaf ... plant ...

also known as (P. delavayi x lutea) Common names: Species Tree Peony. A shrub of very long lifespan. Height: to 3ft, and 3ft wide. Plants from seed wild-collected by Halda near Habashan, Yunnan, China at 3200m in mixed Abies-Rhododendron forest. Small bushes. This would seem to be a natural hybrid between the species delavayi (dark red flowers) and lutea (yellow flowers). Hardiness may be a questionmark at this point; they have been hardy for me here, but have yet to show a flower bud. Recommended site: open shade. Foliage coarse; leaf segment widths between the narrow delavayii and the broader lutea. Large solitary flowers are borne for about a week in late spring, bronze-yellow in the literature, but bright red on the plants which flowered here this year: part of the natural variation of this hybrid species?, or a hybrid of the hybridspecies? I don't know. At any rate, the red is nice and bright and maybe a better colour than was expected. Some uses: Accent, in Shrubbery, Specimens, Rock Gardens, Naturalizing.


Garden Peony:

Mid-height to tall perennials, hardy to zone 3 usually. LOW MAINTENANCE. Of Upright habit, colonizing mainly by slowly creeping rootstocks. Slow-growing and of very long lifespan. Height: variable by individual. Recommended site: sun or light shade. Soil: rich good, loam or heavy clay-loam, reliably moist but well-drained. Easily grown. Deep soil required, incorporating some clay and organic matter but NOT fresh manure. Plant with eyes no deeper than 1-2in or flowering will be drastically reduced. Some references recommend heavy (ie much clay) soil, others recommend a sandy soil (which may well be closer to the soils of the natural range of some species); the lighter, better draining soil is more necessary in the maritimes due to the warmer and wetter winters. Foliage coarse. Large flowers are borne as individuals for a few weeks in late spring, although some types have a few secondary flowers (sidebuds) per stem. Flower colours and form variable. May be fragrant. Some uses: Accent, Borders and Beds, Focus, in Shrubbery, Specimens, Cut Flowers.

One useful observation from several years of growing: if you find your peonies grow too tall or with too flimsy a stem, try them in sun in a dry, unwatered and unfertilized site on a slope, in full sun. My plants in such a field grow somewhat shorter and, because they are always exposed to the winds, the stems are stronger than those grown in sheltered sites. But I think the main factor is reduced water and nutrition.


Paeonia lactiflora or hybrids 0983 $10.75

photos: ...flower ...plants ...

Height: to 2-3'. Unnamed seedlings which I raised from seed of my named plants, and from plants in others' gardens. All have flowered and portraits taken, so you can see what the plant will be. There is only one of each!! so no-one else will have the exact same plant, although some do look identical. Seedling Gallery All the lactifloras are potted up and can go home with a customer at any time; mail order plants will be sent bare-root in fall. Plants with photos in the Seedling Gallery in spring are the remains of previous years' crops; this year's new plants will not be posted until about late July. Customers who visit while the lactifloras are in bloom (late June into July) will have first choice of the new crop and will be able to take their selections home with them at that time.


 


 

... Index (frames) ... Index (no frames) ...

... Home ...